Today
Today

Weighing proposed changes to employee stock options

  • June 20, 2019

The federal government announced in its 2019 budget that it plans to change the rules governing employee stock option deductions by limiting the tax-preferred treatment to a maximum $200,000 annual cap for employees of large, long-established firms, while stock options for employees of start-ups and rapidly growing businesses would remain uncapped for tax purposes.

Proposed changes to refugee determination based on erroneous presumptions

  • June 20, 2019

The CBA’s Immigration Law Section doesn’t like anything about the government’s proposed amendments to Canada’s refugee determination system – not the suggested changes themselves, and certainly not the way they were presented – as part of C-97, the omnibus federal budget implementation bill.

Constructing a federal prompt payment regime

  • June 12, 2019

The CBA’s Construction and Infrastructure Law Section has in the past asked the federal government to introduce prompt payment legislation, so it was happy to see it when it came – but unhappy with the way it was introduced, as part of an omnibus budget implementation bill, C-97.

Herding cats? WTO may open negotiations on e-commerce

  • May 27, 2019

There are 159 countries in the World Trade Organization and when it comes to e-commerce, so far the only thing they’ve been able to agree on is to not put customs duties on electronic transmissions – a moratorium that has been renewed every two years since 1998.

Indigenous language bill needs teeth

  • April 05, 2019

A law that can’t be enforced is an aspiration on a page. A law that purports to protect Indigenous language rights without providing for a way to defend those rights is little more than a “hollow promise,” says the CBA’s Aboriginal Law Section in response to the government’s proposed Bill C-91, the Indigenous Languages Act.